Archive for social

What am I going to tell my boss (Draft – still want comments)

Posted in Web2.0 Productivity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2009 by Lance Strzok

The internet just turned 40 last month, and no one would argue that the result of enabling 1/6th of the people on the planet to communicate and share information using this network has lead to enumerable unforeseen and unplanned benefits.

Web2.0, and its derivatives- Enterprise 2.0, Social media, Government 2.0, are now collectively a combination of ideology, and technologies that together are a disruptive technology with the potential to bring great power to those that leverage it.

We are not fostering the ideology or leveraging the technologies to an appreciable extent, and risk loosing much in the way of power and influence.

The problem is that we have had access to these Web2.0 tools for over 5 years now, with little progress in the way of integrating these tools into our business practices or replacing older tools and technologies. Leadership puts these concepts into vision statements, but does little in the way of delivering actionable plans and integration strategies. Meanwhile the grassroots efforts of many line employees that leverage the technologies have marginalized success, and meet with resistance from supervisors and middle management that have no direction from above on how and what to implement or allow.

This is further muddied with the heavily publicized failings and issues of the use of these technologies on the world wide web (www). You hear about negative issues spanning opsec of personal information and computer cyber security issues and concerns that do in fact exist- on that network. What they don’t talk about, and how the issues you hear about with these tools on TV and in various other media is the difference in attribution. Simply put, on the web, you can be anyone, and say just about anything. Whereas within enterprise
environments, many of these concerns don’t exist because your actions are attributable to you, and your cyber issues are largely behind the firewall. So it is clearly an unfair comparison, and damaging to adoption.

Discussion-
1. Ideology, values, and culture of the “adopters” -It’s about attitude, not Gen-X, Gen-Y etc…
2. Tools and Technologies that facilitate integration of the ideology in business and personal performance
3. Benefits of Integrated Social Media Strategy
4. Not a Utopian solution
5. Current and future tools and technologies
6. What is needed from leadership

The Ideology – (Heavy influence by Gary Hamel)

– Contributing and Sharing – The speed, agility, access to information and communication of the network surpasses individual performance
– Transparency – We each can see what and when others contribute
– Trust – Through transparency we can develop trust and meaningful relationships
– Impact – Desire ability to impact my organization
– Agility – Facilitate a fast pace, minimize bureaucracy
– Easy – Low barriers to contribution
– Egalitarian – Your ideas sink or swim on their own merit and are not based on personal credentials
– Networks are self organized and defined – not prescribed
– Leaders serve rather then preside
– Resources get attracted not allocated
– Power comes from sharing accurate information not hoarding it
– Opinions compound and decisions are peer reviewed

The tools and technology –

There was a time when the tools we had at work were far superior to what we had access to at home, and in some areas, that pendulum has come 180. These tools are readily available at home, and are a large part of many people’s personal productivity. These tools enable and enhance the activities that are valued in Social Media ideology.

Tools and Technology
– Blog (WordPress)
– Wiki (Wikipedia)
– Instant Messaging (Chat)
– Web based file servers for various media (Flickr, Picasa, Google Docs)
– Social Bookmarking
– Keywords and Tags
– RSS
– Social Media platforms (Facebook, MySpace)
– Emergent Social Software Platforms (ESSPs)
– Podcasts
– … Many more

Not really going to talk tools, there are too many, and I am grateful to have access to so many for my work. There are classes you can take to learn about the tools and how to use them to achieve results. What is important to mention is that I have a choice, not one solution that was handed down from corporate IT with a mandate to use it.

These tools have some characteristics in common. I like the mnemonic SLATES coined by Andrew McAfee to discuss those similarities.

– Search – Ability to search within the tool
– Links – Ability to link to other information
– Authoring – Give people the ability to interact with or author
– Tags – Keywords associated with an item
– Extensible – Can be improved and made to work with other tools
– Signals – Can send you an option in notification (email, or RSS)

Benefits of Integrated Social Media Strategy –

Not a Utopian solution –

Current and future tools and technologies –

What is needed from leadership? –

Stated social media goals and guide rails that provide and encourage adoption within the firewall while considering security and expectations when using tools that interact with the world wide web.

Verbalized recognition and encouragement of the use of these tools by managers and employees whenever possible within the firewall for enterprise related work.

Encourage leadership to create a culture in which calculated risks can be taken without fear of loosing job, innovation can take place at the lowest levels of the organization, employees can and do impact how things are done. Understand that flaws will come to the surface, and be ready to engage the workforce on how to fix them in an open and transparent way. I am reminded of forums, and the solution cannot be to simply turn them off. They may have shed light on some of the shortcomings, but ultimately, they represented the silent voice at the table.

Recognize the values of the coming workforce. Understand the tension that may exist with current leadership that came into power under a somewhat different set of values and a different culture to form the existing business model. State a desired direction to evolve from that model toward a new model in which risk, trust, sharing, and collaboration resulting in products with great depth of knowledge and transparency of contributions are to be rewarded.

Empower and encourage network and team building across the entire enterprise utilizing these tools and leveraging those networks and teams against mission areas. Actionable plans put into place and motivated engagement.

Search out and hire people that demonstrate high performance and the skills to integrate their talent with a network of similarly interested and talented people.

Recognize and reward adoption and evolution toward the new model.

Ensure that middle management and immediate supervisors encourage the use of and adoption of these tools by the workforce.

I believe that general
managers are the single most important constituency for tech-
nology success or failure within an organization; yet very few
books or other materials are written especially for them.

[Andrew McAfee]

—-
Thanks to Contributors:
-Dave McDonald
-Joseph Boutte
-Justin Franks
-Andrew McAfee
-Nick Charney
-Brock Webb
-Chris Rasmussen

—-
Resources and links
http://andrewmcafee.org/enterprise-20-book-and-blurbs/
http://oreilly.com/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WEB2.0
http://blogs.wsj.com/management/2009/03/24/the-facebook-generation-vs-the-fortune-500/

What am I going to tell my boss?

Posted in Web2.0 Productivity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2009 by Lance Strzok

I am drafting an argument that I am presenting to leadership tomorrow. I have 15 minutes to describe, educate, and influence our organizations burgeoning Social Media strategy.

For those of you that both actively and passively interact with this blog, please consider taking a moment to comment below with what you think the most important points of that discussion should be.

My outline thus far has (in no particular order):

Quick intro to E2.0, Web2.0, Social Media, Gov2.0 terms.

The social media tools and the properties of what makes those tools successful, (SLATES).

The values and culture of the coming workforce that want access to these tools and are used to working as networks toward a common goal.

How to create an environment that allows these new workers (and their networks) to succeed or exceed current efforts against stated goals.

This culture is not about superstars, but large numbers of high performing individuals working as a network, enabled by these technologies, and motivated by common values.

Again, if you see anything glaringly absent, or you think it more important, please let me know.

I am going to post this work this evening when I am done writing, and your thoughts and comments will have been considered.

(Have a terrific week).

– GLS.

Individual Performance Objectives FY 2010

Posted in Web2.0 Productivity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 17, 2009 by Lance Strzok

1. Publish on Social Media and Collaboration.

-Compose, review and publish to the workforce, a quarterly newsletter “The feed”.
-Coordinate with the CIO, KM, Hopper, Innovation Office, KTP, Social Media, and Training departments to maintain status on programs, dates, and articles on related content of interest.
* Ensure that at least one article on relevant material is reviewed and included in the quarterly newsletter.
* Ensure that the status report items in the newsletter reflect current information on existing programs, and include new or dropped programs as well.
* Include one personal freeform exposition per subject area with an “outlook” and or “something to ponder” subject.
-Write on collaborative culture.
* How is collaboration different then coordination?
* What are some of the challenges to collaborating in our work environment?
* What are some of the fears of collaborating?
* What are some of the values, ethics, and motives in a collaborative culture?
* A definition of collaborative culture within our community.

* Supports CIO FY10 requirements for information sharing, knowledgement IAW http://www.doncio.navy.mil/uploads/DONCIO_Campaign_Plan_FY2010_v2_508.pdf

2. Social Media, Collaboration and Web Security Training

– Provide a minimum of 4 courses on Social Media and Collaboration to the workforce before September 30 2010. This course shall cover at a minimum A-space, Intellipedia, Inteldocs, Blogs, Intelink, Gallery, iVideo, Microblogging, IC-Connect, Sharepoint, Tag|Connect, and Instant Messaging.
– Provide social media and anonymous browsing training for a minimum of 3 opensource classes.
– Provide Social Media training to a minimum of 3 Tools 101 classes.

3. Provide consulting on Social Media tools to the IC, departments, divisions, fleet assest and individuals on an as requested basis. Provide chat room support to A-space, Collaboration Help, Intellipublia, Compass, and Evolution IC.

– Actively seek, identify, and make recommendations for business practices that may be enhanced with the use of social media tools.
– Document these activities with specific customers, providing clear problems and potential solutions for lessons learned and best practices usage.

4. Identify, test, and evaluate emerging technologies and best practices for incorporation into our IT enterprise.

– Implement 3 new technologies by end of FY10.

Blog vs email – Which one is work?

Posted in Web2.0 Productivity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 17, 2009 by Lance Strzok

So the other day I realized that I need to keep track of the blogs that I respond to.

I realized that my responses to many blogs are very thoughtful and include quite a bit of cognitive effort to respond to in a meaningful way. This time, and effort, is not being captured and considered a part of my “work”.

How then are blogs and blog responses any different than emails and email responses? And why is one clearly considered work and the other considered a toy? Are my blog entries and blog responses any less valuable than an email? In fact how is it that my blog entries are not more valuable and more authoritative than an email since they are drafted to a greater audience and require more thought than a simple response to an email from a single person? I would argue that the transparency that my blog responses embody have just as much if not more value than something in an email. In addition to that, I contend that my blog entries are persistent, discoverable, and can be referenced by others (ping backs) when and where appropriate.

When I draft a response to a work-related issue in a blog, it is potentially being viewed by many and will persist. I am compelled to ensure that my reply is meaningful and accurately represents what I think about a given topic. That it is written with the intent of sharing or collaborating on the subject at hand.

When I draft an email response to a colleague, I do the same thing, but to a lesser extent because I know it is to a smaller audience.

So who really benefits from my insight and cognitive effort between the two mediums?

The greater good comes from my sharing my thoughts on a subject via a blog, where many can discover the conversation, and use my cognitive work. This is far more useful than an email that is sent and sits in a single individual’s saved email for future use by only that person.

Now to consider how to move ahead.

If I receive a work-related email involving an issue that is potentially pertinent to multiple people and will require considerable effort and thought when drafting a response, why wouldn’t I consider posting the question and response in a blog? This invites my network of peers and colleagues to enhance the response and send a link back to the originator. Who really benefits here? Everyone.

This is not to say that email should never be used. But, perhaps, its clear-cut use has and should be primarily the realm of personal and private conversations. If it is work, why would you share it with so few when so many could benefit from your cognitive effort? Not only could they and learn from you, but they could also help you learn if they feel compelled to add to the response as well.

So, tell me what you think? Are my blog responses work – or not? Are yours? Why are email messages considered work and blogs not?

Who likes maintaining email distribution lists?

Posted in Web2.0 Productivity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on September 22, 2009 by Lance Strzok

So I had a Eureka moment last Friday.

I had been (back burner) crunching on how to avoid maintaining a distribution list for a publication that I am involved with (Innovation Office “Threads”).

I simply did not want to be the guy getting all those emails and maintaining the distribution list (call me lazy – fine). Also of importance here is that I still get emails from DL’s that I no longer want too, but getting my name off of them is not always straight forward since people come and go and you can loose track of who is maintaining a given DL. I simply wanted a way to allow people to get the “signal” that there is a new article, and stop it if they decided they did not want it anymore.

I also wanted to socialize the existence of the publication since it really just takes a topic (typically software) of interest to analysts and tries to boil it down to a fairly understandable description of what it is and how it can be used.

I wanted to embed a link in the articles, (typically .pdf files), that are created to take readers to this page where they could control the signal, (be it email or RSS), they are getting.

So I created a page in our Enterprise wiki that is about “Threads”, and on it, there are several sections;

– Purpose of the publication (described earlier)

– A link to the folder in Inteldocs so that users can subscribe to the folder in which I put the articles (subscriptions generate an email to the user each time there is a new article placed in the folder)

– A section for adding or removing your email address from a distribution list that I will use each time I send out an email of the article (for those without access to Inteldocs)

– A section for requesting future articles (always want to know what people want to learn about)

– A section for others to put links to similar articles or publications

I embed the link and a word “subscribe” in the articles to link to this page where people can control what signals they get and can also send to other people.

The fact that it is an Enterprise wiki matters because I want the “username” of people that make changes to it to be transparent to those using the wiki. That way people can be held accountable for making changes to the list.

My question to you – What do you think of this as a best practice with regard to DL’s and publications? What would you do to make it better?

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Want to declare yourself a Social Media and Collaboration COI member please do so here and I will include you in future posts via email or you can RSS this blog.